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Elekta | Focus Magazine

Gamma Knife study: patients with up to 10 brain mets

Study provides further evidence in favor of Gamma Knife radiosurgery as frontline treatment in patients with 4+ brain mets – Gamma Knife SRS known for lower toxicity/side effects and fewer treatment sessions – Potential to treat and retreat a patient with Gamma Knife over a long time period Clinicians at 23 Japanese medical centers continued…

Patients benefit from Icon at Samsung Medical Center

Among the world’s most prolific users of Leksell Gamma Knife® Icon™, Samsung Medical Center (SMC, Seoul) has set an industrious pace of about 18 patient treatments per week since the system was installed in January 2016….

Hong Kong facility brings new hope with Icon

Living up to its name and reputation, The Brain Centre (Hong Kong) upgraded its Gamma Knife® system in June 2016 to Leksell Gamma Knife® Icon™, refining and expanding its Gamma Knife radiosurgery capabilities. Today, frameless fractionated radiosurgery with Icon – maintaining the extreme accuracy for which frame-based Gamma Knife® radiosurgery is renowned – is benefitting…

UMM Mannheim RO brings SRS to next level with Icon

Appreciating that Leksell Gamma Knife® Icon™ represents the quintessential platform for performing intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), clinicians at Universitätsmedizin Mannheim (UMM) set about in 2014 to incorporate the technology into their well-equipped radiation therapy department. SRS, a stable treatment technique at UMM since 2001, had been delivered exclusively via linear accelerator for all intracranial cases…

A new trick for pro BMX rider Josh Perry

Thrilling ups and downs, rapid turns and hard crashes are all part of life. Sometimes things take a smooth, predictable approach and other times you get caught in a tailspin from out of nowhere that slams you hard on the concrete. It’s not really about how hard you fall, but more about how quickly you…

Spine radiosurgery offers help for patients in pain

Radiotherapy of spinal metastases to help patients suffering from debilitating pain is among the most technically challenging treatments to execute. To avoid dosing the spinal cord, clinicians must do several things proficiently: patient immobilization, lesion characterization, treatment planning, beam shaping (i.e., targeting) and detection of, and accounting for, intrafraction motion. To maintain the submillimeter/subdegree precision…